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Where did the Blake coat of arms come from? When did the Blake family first arrive in the United States?

  
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Coat of Arms > Blake Coat of Arms


Blake Coat of Arms
 Blake Coat of Arms
Blake

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Origin Displayed: Irish

Origins Available: English, Irish

Spelling variations of this family name include: Blake, Caddell, Caddle and others.

First found in Connacht where the Blake family were one of the Tribes of Galway, descending from Richard Caddell (le Blac), sheriff of Connacht in 1303, who came to Ireland with Prince John in 1185, and used both the surnames Caddell and Blake. The name Caddell is Welsh, and means "warlike." It was not replaced completely by Blake until the 17th century, and for three hundred years, people with these surnames were referred to in municipal records by both names. Richard Caddle was sheriff of Connaught in 1306 A.D.

Some of the first settlers of this family name or some of its variants were: William Blake who came from Essex, England, sailed on the "Mary and John" in 1630 and settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts; George Blake settled in Gloucester in 1640.

(From www.HouseOfNames.com Archives copyright © 2000 - 2009)



Suggested Readings for the name Blake
"The Blake-Ambrose Family History" by Irma Ruth M. Anderson, "The Blaikes of Bibb County, Alabama,1819-1988" by Chester Rankin Johnson Jr.

Some noteworthy people of the name Blake
  • Lillie Devereaux Blake (1835-1913), American author and reformer, known for her efforts in the women's suffrage and economic rights movements
  • Eugene Carson Blake (1906-1985), American Clergyman, general secretary of the World Council of Churches
  • Francis Blake (1850-1913), American inventor of a telephone transmitter
  • Lieutenant General Gordon Aylesworth Blake (1910-1997), American Air Force Officer who served from 1962-1965 as director of the National Security Agency
  • James Hubert "Eubie" Blake (1887-1983), American composer, lyricist, and pianist of ragtime, jazz, and popular music and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom
  • Amanda Blake (1929-1989), American actress best known for the role of the red-haired "Miss Kitty" on the longest-running television drama, CBS's Gunsmoke series (1955-1975)
  • William Burdine Blake Sr. (1852-1938), American music composer and newspaper publisher
  • Marty Blake (1927-2013), American basketball executive, GM of Atlanta Hawks (1954–1970), NBA Director of Scouting (1976–2011)
  • Arthur Blake (1872-1944), American one time silver Olympic medalist for athletics during the 1896 games
  • Major Wilfred Theodore Blake (1894-1968), British pioneer aviator, travel writer and traveller who led the first attempt to fly round the world in 1922

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Clan Badge


Blake, sept of the Clan Lamont

Is your family of Scottish descent? If so, you can proudly display the Lamont Clan Badge. This clan badge is used by all septs of that clan.


Learn More About Irish Surnames


ANCIENT ORIGINS OF IRELAND

According to Irish tradition, the ancient kings of Ireland were the descendants of King Milesius of Spain. Milesius was the grandson of Breoghan, conqueror of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal, who was also called Brigus or Brian. Milesius achieved outstanding military success in Egypt, and was given Scota, the Pharoah's daughter, in marriage. When Spain underwent a twenty-six year famine, Milesius sent his uncle Ithe to seek a new homeland, in accordance with an ancient prophecy. After Ithe discovered Ireland, only to be murdered by the resident Tuatha de Danan, his son Lughaide brought his body home to Spain.

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MAJOR FACTS INFLUENCING IRISH FAMILIES AND SURNAMES

The history and people of Ireland are a fascinating subject of study. Ireland is an island of the British Isles, to the west of Great Britain, and it is divided into the Irish Republic and Northern Ireland. Ireland is renowned for its lush green landscape, festive atmosphere and friendly populace. The vibrant culture of the modern Irish is a product of Ireland's ancient history.

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FLIGHT OF THE WILD GEESE

For approximately two centuries, a great number of able-bodied young Irishmen emigrated from Ireland. This migration, which took place over the 17th and 18th centuries, is colloquially known as the 'Flight of the Wild Geese'.

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THE PROVINCE OF CONNAUGHT

Connaught is the westernmost province of Ireland. In the modern era, the spelling changed to Connacht. This province has a population of approximately 424,000 today, and contains the counties of Galway, Leitrim, Mayo, Roscommon, and Sligo. These county names have remained the same since the Middle Ages.

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THE CROMWELLIAN INVASION OF IRELAND

After the clans were banished from the Scottish/English Borderlands in 1603, many clan families emigrated to Ireland, which was nominally called the Plantation of Ulster. The area was particularly attractive to the emigrants because the British parliament had created a land scheme to attract settlers to the area.

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THE PROVINCE OF LEINSTER

Leinster is in the southeast of Ireland, and is the most populous of the four provinces, with approximately 1,500,000 people. This province contains the counties of Carlow, Dublin, Kilkenny, Laois (formerly Leix), Longford, Louth, Meath, Offaly, Westmeath, Wexford, and Wicklow. These divisions have remained the same from the Middle Ages to the present.

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THE PROVINCE OF MUNSTER

Munster is the southernmost of the four Irish provinces.

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PLANTATION OF ULSTER

During the early 17th century, the Plantation of Ulster was an attractive area of settlement for migrants within the British Empire. The Plantation was composed of six entire counties, namely, Armagh, Tyrone, Coleraine, Donegal, Fermanagh and Cavan, which were confiscated as a result of a war between Hugh O'Neill, Earl of Tyrone and Queen Elizabeth. As a result, about 3,798,000 statute acres were under the crown of England.

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IRISH POTATO FAMINE

The Irish Potato Famine, which lasted from 1845 to 1850, resulted in a great exodus of Irish refugees fleeing to Britain, Australia, and North America, one of the most dramatic waves of Irish migration in history.

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SEPTS OF IRELAND

Prior to the development of hereditary surnames in Ireland, there was a sept system by which families were divided into broad clans or tribes. These were usually based on a common descent from a particularly notable ancestor. For example, the septs who all claimed descent from the famed 4th century warrior king Niall of the Nine Hostages were collectively known as the Ui Neill, or the Hy Niall. Other particularly distinguished groups of ancient septs included the Ui Fiachra, the Ui Maine (also called the Hy Many), the Cinel Eoghain, the Clann Cholgain, the Corca Laighe, and the Dal Cair (also known as the Dalcassians). The use of surnames gradually rendered the sept system obsolete.

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ULSTER

ANCIENT ULSTER

The northern region of Ulster was an ancient kingdom, and one of the four historic Provinces of Ireland. The region was mostly annexed by the English Crown during the reign of James I (1603-1625).

In the Middle Ages, the Province of Ulster contained the counties Donegal, Derry, Antrim, Down, Armagh, Cavan, Monaghan, Fermanagh, and Tyrone.

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WHITE SAILS

The White Sails are one of the romantic nicknames for sailing ships that carried Irish and Scottish immigrants across the Atlantic and into the New World. Numerous Irish, Scottish and British emigrated on these timber ships and traveled in the steerage berths of cargo ships. The ships were also called coffin ships because of the high numbers of casualties that resulted from the trial of the passage.

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O' PREFIX

Irish patronymic surnames frequently feature the distinctive prefix O'. When these surnames were originally developed, they were formed by adding the Gaelic words O, Hy or Ui denote descendant of, [1] to the name of the original bearer's grandfather or to that of an earlier ancestor. For example, the surname O'Neil literally means descendant of Neil (Niall). While the O prefix is more commonly used today, ancient records include all of the above and have been used interchangeably.

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STRONGBOW

As with the fall of Troy, the long conquest of Ireland began with a dispute over the abduction of a beautiful woman. In 1167, Dermod MacMorough, the King of Leinster, is said to have kidnapped Dearvorgil, the wife of Tiernan O'Rourke, the Prince of West Brefney. However, this so-called 'abduction' may be described more accurately as an elopement. This incident led to the invasion and conquest of Leinster by Roderick O'Connor, the king of Connacht and self-styled monarch of Ireland, who sided with O'Rourke. Fleeing to England, the defeated MacMorough sought the aid of King Henry II, who allowed MacMorough to gather support among his subjects in return for an oath of fealty.

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IRELAND

Ireland was first settled in about 6000 BC by a race of Middle Stone Age hunter-gatherers who lived there and hunted such creatures as the megaceros, a giant variety of deer so large that their antlers spanned 10 feet. Around 3000 BC, they made significant technological improvements which moved them into the classification of Bronze Age people. These people eventually came to be known as the Picts, who ruled over Ireland for millennia and even expanded to Scotland. Irish folklore tells that during these very early times, two sons of King Milesius of Iberia conquered Ireland, becoming King Heremon, and his brother Heber. It is said that after assuming power in Ireland Heremon slew his brother, took the throne and fathered a line of kings of Ireland[1] that includes Malachi II and King Niall of the Nine Hostages.

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HIGH KINGS OF IRELAND

Eireamhón 1434-1418 BC (Eremon)
Éibhear 1434-1433 BC (Eber)
Muimhne 1418-1415 BC
Luighne 1418-1415 BC
Laighne 1418-1415 BC
Ir 1415-1415 BC
Orba 1415-1415 BC
Fearán 1415-1415 BC
Fergen 1415-1415 BC
Nuadhat I Neacht 1415-1414 BC
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ANCIENT CELTIC FAMILIES

In MacFirbis's "Irish Genealogies" the following Celtic names are designated "Maghaidh Saxonta" ("magadh: Irish; mocking, jeering); meaning that it was only in jest these names were said to be of Saxon origin:

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FAMILIES IN IRELAND FROM THE 11TH CENTURY TO THE END OF THE 16TH CENTURY

FAMILIES IN IRELAND FROM THE 11th TO
THE END OF THE 16th CENTURY.

According to "A Topographical and Historical Map of Ancient Ireland," compiled by Philip MacDermott, M.D., the following were the names of the principal families in Ireland, of Irish, Anglo-Norman, and Anglo-Irish origin.

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IRISH PROVINCES

The following provinces of Ireland are significant in historical research of surnames and for the most part have survived the centuries as they were once held.

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This page was last modified on 20 February 2014 at 10:54.

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