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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2014

Where did the English Weeks family come from? What is the English Weeks family crest and coat of arms? When did the Weeks family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Weeks family history?

The name Weeks reached English shores for the first time with the ancestors of the Weeks family as they migrated following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Weeks family lived in Sussex. The name, however, derives from the Old English word wic, which describes someone who lives at an outlying settlement.

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Before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Sound was what guided spelling in the Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Weeks family name include Weekes, Weeks, Wikes, Wykes, Wyke, Wix, Wicks, Weykes and many more.

First found in Sussex where they held a family seat from early times.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Weeks research. Another 315 words(22 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1086, 1703, 1222, 1293, 1554, 1554, 1430, 1554, 1621, 1593, 1643, 1627, 1641, 1628, 1699, 1632, 1707, 1683 and 1684 are included under the topic Early Weeks History in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Another 207 words(15 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Weeks Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

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To escape the political and religious chaos of this era, thousands of English families began to migrate to the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. The passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe; however, those who made the voyage safely were encountered opportunities that were not available to them in their homeland. Many of the families that reached the New World at this time went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. Research into various historical records has revealed some of first members of the Weeks family to immigrate North America:

Weeks Settlers in the United States in the 17th Century


  • Leonard Weeks settled in New Hampshire in 1630
  • Symon Weeks, aged 16, arrived in St Christopher in 1634
  • Richard Weeks settled in Virginia in 1635
  • Francis Weeks, who arrived in Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1635
  • Jo Weeks, aged 18, arrived in Virginia in 1635


Weeks Settlers in the United States in the 18th Century


  • Richard Weeks, who landed in Jamaica in 1707
  • Elinor Weeks, who arrived in Virginia in 1714
  • March Weeks, who landed in Virginia in 1730
  • Christian Weeks, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1761

Weeks Settlers in the United States in the 19th Century


  • Edmund Weeks, who landed in America in 1806
  • Sarah Weeks, aged 34, landed in Massachusetts in 1812
  • Charles Weeks, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1815
  • Caroline Weeks, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1816
  • Jane Weeks, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1816


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  • Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903), American artist
  • Jeffrey Renwick Weeks, American mathematician
  • Dr. Kent R. Weeks (b. 1941), American Egyptologist
  • Charles Sinclair Weeks (1893-1972), United States Secretary of Commerce (1953-1958)
  • Willie Weeks (b. 1947), American bass guitarist
  • Brent Weeks (1977-1977), American author, best known for The Night Angel Trilogy
  • John Wingate Weeks (1860-1926), American politician in the Republican Party, Secretary of War from 1921 to 1925
  • Rickie Weeks (b. 1982), American Major League Baseball second baseman
  • Sinclair Weeks (1893-1972), United States Secretary of Commerce under Dwight Eisenhower
  • Alan Weeks (1923-1996), British television sports reporter

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  • Geo. Weeks: Genealogy of the Family of George Weeks, of Dorchester, Mass., 1635-1650 by Robert Dodd Weekes.
  • The Weeks Family of Southern New Jersey by Elmer Garfield Van Name.
  • Family Reminiscences by Minnie Marcella Feinberg.
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The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Cari Deo nihilo carent
Motto Translation: Those dear to God want nothing.

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  1. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  2. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
  3. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin . Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  4. Burke, John Bernard Ed. The Roll of Battle Abbey. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  5. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
  6. Hitching, F.K and S. Hitching. References to English Surnames in 1601-1602. Walton On Thames: 1910. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0181-3).
  7. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  8. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
  9. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
  10. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  11. ...

The Weeks Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Weeks Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 13 September 2014 at 14:18.

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