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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2014

Where did the English Newey family come from? When did the Newey family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Newey family history?

The Anglo-Saxon name Newey comes from when the family resided near a yew tree. Newey is a local surname, which belongs to the category of hereditary surnames. In this case, the surname Newey comes from the Old English phrase, atten ew, which means, at the yew tree. The surname Newey may also derive from the Old English word newe, which means new. This may have been a name given to newcomers to an area, and as such, it would have been a nickname surname.

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The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Newey has been recorded under many different variations, including Newe, New, News, Newes, Nuce and others.

First found in Cambridgeshire. Castle Newe was a mansion house, situated in Aberdeenshire, built in 1831 by Archibald Simpson. Newe House, a manor house in the village of Pakenham, Suffolk remains today as it was built in 1622 by Sir Robert Bright. Neither of these edifices have any relation to the surname.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Newey research. Another 175 words(12 lines of text) covering the years 1234, 1273, and 1886 are included under the topic Early Newey History in all our PDF Extended History products.

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More information is included under the topic Early Newey Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Some of the Newey family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 75 words(5 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products.

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For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Newey or a variant listed above:

Newey Settlers in the United States in the 19th Century


  • Mrs. Newey, aged 34, who emigrated to the United States from Birmingham, in 1892
  • John Newey, aged 21, who landed in America from Nottingham, in 1893

Newey Settlers in the United States in the 20th Century


  • Grace Newey, aged 2, who settled in America from Liverpool, in 1900
  • George Albert Newey, aged 28, who landed in America from Burmingham, in 1906
  • Samuel Newey, aged 24, who landed in America from Birmingham, England, in 1907
  • Aequila Newey, aged 29, who settled in America from Birmingham, England, in 1909
  • Albert Newey, aged 50, who emigrated to the United States from Birmingham, England, in 1909


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  • Whitney K. Newey, American professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who co-developed the Newey-West estimator
  • Thomas William "Tom" Newey (b. 1982), English football defender
  • Adrian Newey OBE (b. 1958), British Formula One racing car designer and engineer from Stratford-Upon-Avon
  • Glen Newey, Britsh political philosopher and Professor of Political Theory at the Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium


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  1. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage and Baronetage, The Privy Council, Knightage and Compainonage. London: Burke Publishing, 1921. Print.
  2. Burke, Sir Bernard. General Armory Of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Ramsbury: Heraldry Today. Print.
  3. Hitching, F.K and S. Hitching. References to English Surnames in 1601-1602. Walton On Thames: 1910. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0181-3).
  4. Burke, John Bernard Ed. The Roll of Battle Abbey. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  5. Holt, J.C. Ed. Domesday Studies. Woodbridge: Boydell, 1987. Print. (ISBN 0-85115-477-8).
  6. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
  7. Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Galveston Texas 1896-1951. National Archives Washington DC. Print.
  8. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
  9. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  10. Elster, Robert J. International Who's Who. London: Europa/Routledge. Print.
  11. ...


This page was last modified on 21 August 2012 at 07:47.

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