Home   |   Customer Service   |   Site Map   |   Name Search   |   How To Buy

Shopping Cart
0 Items
BBB - A+ Rating - the best there is
  
Decrease Font Size Font Size Increase Font Size
An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2014

Where did the English Ludlam family come from? When did the Ludlam family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Ludlam family history?

The Anglo-Saxon name Ludlam comes from when the family resided on a hill beside a babbling river which was later referred to as Ludlow Ludlam is a topographic surname, which was given to a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree. Habitation names form the other broad category of surnames that were derived from place-names. They were derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads. Other local names are derived from the names of houses, manors, estates, regions, and entire counties.

 More

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, French and other languages became incorporated into English through the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Ludlam include Ludlow, Ludley, Ludloe and others.

First found in Shropshire at Ludlow, a market town close to the Welsh border and in the Welsh Marches. The first listing of the place name dates back to 1138 where it was listed as Ludelaue and literally meant "hill or tumulus by a rapid," derived from the Old English words hlude + hlaw. [1] Ludlow was called by the Britons Dinam, or "the palace of princes," and by the Saxons Leadlowe, and Ludlowe. One reference claims Robert de Montgomery, kinsman of the Conqueror, fortified the town with walls, and erected most of its stately castle in which he lived until his death in 1094. Yet another reference claims the castle was built by Walter de Lacy in the late 11th century as possession of Ludlow Castle descended through the Lacy family until 1115.


 More

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ludlam research. Another 137 words(10 lines of text) covering the years 1590, 1664, 1634, 1617 and 1692 are included under the topic Early Ludlam History in all our PDF Extended History products.

 More

Another 113 words(8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ludlam Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

 More

Some of the Ludlam family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 55 words(4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products.

 More

A great wave of immigration to the New World was the result of the enormous political and religious disarray that struck England at that time. Families left for the New World in extremely large numbers. The long journey was the end of many immigrants and many more arrived sick and starving. Still, those who made it were rewarded with an opportunity far greater than they had known at home in England. These emigrant families went on to make significant contributions to these emerging colonies in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers carried this name or one of its variants:

Ludlam Settlers in the United States in the 18th Century


  • Richard Ludlam, who arrived in South Carolina in 1723

 More

 More

  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)

Other References

  1. Shirley, Evelyn Philip. Noble and Gentle Men of England Or Notes Touching The Arms and Descendants of the Ancient Knightley and Gentle Houses of England Arranged in their Respective Counties 3rd Edition. Westminster: John Bowyer Nichols and Sons, 1866. Print.
  2. Marcharn, Frederick George. A Constitutional History of Modern England 1485 to the Present. London: Harper and Brothers, 1960. Print.
  3. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  4. Hanks, Hodges, Mills and Room. The Oxford Names Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. Print. (ISBN 0-19-860561-7).
  5. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  6. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
  7. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  8. Skordas, Guest. Ed. The Early Settlers of Maryland an Index to Names or Immigrants Complied from Records of Land Patents 1633-1680 in the Hall of Records Annapolis, Maryland. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1968. Print.
  9. Foster, Joseph. Dictionary of Heraldry Feudal Coats of Arms and Pedigrees. London: Bracken Books, 1989. Print. (ISBN 1-85170-309-8).
  10. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
  11. ...


This page was last modified on 4 December 2013 at 08:29.

2000-2014 Swyrich Corporation. See Terms of Use for details.
houseofnames.com is an internet property owned by Swyrich Corporation.


Sign Up


BBB - A+ Rating - the best there is