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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2014

Where did the Scottish Darrah family come from? When did the Darrah family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Darrah family history?

The ancestors of the Darrah family were part of an ancient Scottish tribe called the Picts. They lived in Darroch in Stirlinghsire. The name could also be derived a form of the lost name MacDara which meant son of oak and others believe the name is from Dath riabhach. Literally, the name comes from the Gaelic "darach" which means "oak tree."

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Prior to the invention of the printing press in the last hundred years, documents were basically unique. Names were written according to sound, and often appeared differently each time they were recorded. Spelling variations of the name Darrah include Darroch, Darrow, Darrach, Daroch, Darach, Darragh, Darrogh, Darrioch, Darraugh, Darrough and many more.

First found in Stirlingshire, where they held a family seat from ancient times.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Darrah research. Another 196 words(14 lines of text) covering the years 1406, 1462, 1500, and 1784 are included under the topic Early Darrah History in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Another 34 words(2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Darrah Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Some of the Darrah family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 123 words(9 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products.

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The freedom of the North American colonies was enticing, and many Scots left to make the great crossing. It was a long and hard journey, but its reward was a place where there was more land than people and tolerance was far easier to come by. Many of these people came together to fight for a new nation in the American War of Independence, while others remained loyal to the old order as United Empire Loyalists. The ancestors of Scots in North America have recovered much of this heritage in the 20th century through Clan societies and other such organizations. A search of immigration and passenger lists revealed many important and early immigrants to North America bearing the name of Darrah:

Darrah Settlers in the United States in the 18th Century


  • Robert Darrah, who arrived in New England in 1738

Darrah Settlers in the United States in the 19th Century


  • James Darrah, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1838
  • John Darrah, aged 28, who landed in America from Antrim, in 1893

Darrah Settlers in the United States in the 20th Century


  • William Darrah, aged 26, who landed in America from Ireland, in 1907
  • Mrs. B. W. Darrah, who emigrated to the United States, in 1908
  • Thomas W. Darrah, aged 35, who landed in America, in 1908
  • William Darrah, aged 23, who settled in America from Cummingstown, Ireland, in 1911
  • Charles Darrah, aged 53, who emigrated to the United States from Cheadle, England, in 1920


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  • John W. Darrah (b. 1938), United States federal judge from Chicago, Illinois
  • Lydia Barrington Darrah (1728-1789), American woman said to have crossed British lines during the British occupation of Philadelphia, during the American Revolutionary War, and gave information to George Washington about the pending British attack
  • William Lindsey "Bill" Darrah (1876-1920), American sheep rancher and stonemason known for his construction of lava rock water tanks in Idaho


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  1. Catholic Directory For Scotland. Glasgow: Burns Publications. Print.
  2. Moody David. Scottish Family History. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1994. Print. (ISBN 0806312688).
  3. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  4. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
  5. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  6. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  7. Bain, Robert. The Clans and Tartans of Scotland. Glasgow & London: Collins, 1968. Print. (ISBN 000411117-6).
  8. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
  9. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  10. Urquhart, Blair Edition. Tartans The New Compact Study Guide and Identifier. Secauccus, NJ: Chartwell Books, 1994. Print. (ISBN 0-7858-0050-6).
  11. ...


This page was last modified on 7 June 2014 at 13:51.

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